The Vegetables We Grow

Here's information about some of the vegetables we grow and sell.


Microgreens-Pea Shoots

Pea Shoots - Microgreens

Botanical Name:

Flavor:

Texture:




Microgreens-Radish Shoots

Radish Shoots - Microgreens

Botanical Name:

Flavor:

Texture:




Arugula

Botanical Name: Eruca Sativa, Diplotaxis spp.

Flavor:

Texture:

The standard salad arugula. Long, dark, lobed leaves are suitable for salad mix or bunching. Edible Flowers: The white flowers with dark pink veins are edible, and can be harvested as they appear. Sprinkle them over salads or add to vegetable stir-fries. Flavor is spicy and nutty. Popular choice for brightening up salad mixes.

31 Arugula Recipes So You Can Eat It All the Time—from BON APPÉTIT—Link

Serious Salads: Arugula, Fennel and Orange Salad—From Serious Eats—Link


Hakurei Turnip

Botanical Name: Brassica Rapa

Flavor: Sweet and Fruity

Texture: Crisp and Tender

This white salad turnip was developed in Japan in the '50s. Young, radish-size turnips can be harvested after growing for 30 days, with full-size turmips ready in 40 to 50 days. They’re delicious raw and can be added into salads or slaws.

When cooked, they have a buttery flavor. When roasted their sweetness increases. The greens of the turnip's top can be sautéed. Turnips should not be overcooked, or they will become dark in color and strong in flavor. The summer turnip, when sliced, can be cooked in thirty minutes, the winter turnip in from forty-five to sixty minutes. They can be braised, fried, glazed, or sautéed.

There’s no need to peel the Hakurei, simply trim the ends and wash them under cold water. The green tops do need a more thorough washing.

Turnips with greens can be stored at 32°F (0°C), 95% relative humidity for up to 14 days. When you remove the green tops, the turnips can be stored in the crisper drawer of the fridge for a week to ten days. They are not intended for long-term winter storage.

Glazed Hakurei Turnips Recipe—From BON APPÉTIT—Link

Sautéed Japanese Turnips With Turnip Greens Recipe—From Serious Eats—Link


Radish

Botanical Name: Raphanus Sativus

Flavor: Pungent and Peppery

Texture: Tender Yet Crisp

We grow a variety of radish called “Cherriette”. It has uniform roots with medium tops and bright-red roots. Radishes are mostly used in salads. Radish leaves are sometimes used in dishes like potato soup or as a sauteed side dish. Topped radishes will keep up to four weeks when kept at 32°F and 95% relative humidity in breathable packaging.


Bok Choy

Botanical Name: Brassica Rap, subsp. Chinensis

Flavor: Mellow, Peppery Spice

Texture: Tender and Crisp Leaves, Crunchy and Firm Stalks

Bok choy (or pak choi, or pok choi) is a type of Chinese cabbage. Bok choy varieties do not form heads and have smooth, dark green leaf blades. Bok choy comes in mature and baby sizes.

Stir-Fried Bok Choy Recipe—From Serious Eats—Link

Crispy Salmon with Steamed Bok Choy and Basil-Caper Relish Recipe—From Serious Eats—Link


Bush Beans

Botanical Name: Phaseolus Vulgaris

Flavor:

Texture:

We grow the variety Provider.

We grow the variety Provider.

We grow the variety Provider.

We grow the variety Provider.


Lettuce

Botanical Name: Lactuca Sativa

Flavor:

Texture:

We grow the variety Salanova® Green Sweet Crisp.

We grow the variety Salanova® Green Sweet Crisp.

We grow the variety Salanova® Green Sweet Crisp.

We grow the variety Salanova® Green Sweet Crisp.


Snap Peas

Botanical Name: Pisum Sativum

Flavor:

Texture:

We grow the variety Super Sugar Snap.

We grow the variety Super Sugar Snap.

We grow the variety Super Sugar Snap.

We grow the variety Super Sugar Snap.